Do you prefer to avoid installing software? Video download helper sites do the download work for you, providing conversion and then a download link—you don't have to install anything on your PC. It can take a lot longer, depending on the size and quality of the video you want—a typical two-minute movie trailer in 1080p can be around 30MB—but you can't beat the convenience.
The Chrome Web Store—where you get Chrome browser extensions—is controlled by YouTube's owner Alphabet/Google. Even an extension ostensibly for this purpose—like the obviously named Video Downloader professional above—states right up front in its description, "The download of YouTube videos to hard drive is locked because of restrictions of the Chrome Store." In general with Chrome extensions, the download of any RTMP protocol video (protected videos) or streaming video isn't possible.
The first thing you should do is set up two-step verification (if you haven’t already). That way, if someone manages to crack your password, they’ll still be locked out of your account unless they somehow obtain physical access to your phone, too. You should also set up a recovery phone number, so if you do get locked out you’ll be able to regain access to your YouTube/Google account.
Step 3: Choose your targeted video format from the top right corner. There are a lot of formats available. Including MP4, AVI, MKV, and MOV. After this, click on the conversion icon on the right of the chosen file. If you have to convert all the videos in the chosen list, simply choose the “Convert All” option on the bottom right of the main window.
YouTubeByClick captures video from over 40 sites. Before you even do the first download, you can use the "dials" on the interface to set up a preferred download format (MP4 video or MP3 audio) and a default download quality as high as 8K, even on the free version. Downloading a 580MB MKV file in 4K only took 55 seconds—not bad at all, but that was with the premium version's unlimited speed. The free edition took a lot longer with the 2MB speed limit. You also need the premium version to download playlists and channels, do conversions, avoid ads, and get closed captions.
Eric has been writing about tech for over 27 years. He was on the founding staff of Windows Sources, FamilyPC, and Access Internet Magazine (all defunct, and it's not his fault). He's the author of two novels, BETA TEST ("an unusually lighthearted apocalyptic tale"--Publishers' Weekly) and KALI: THE GHOSTING OF SEPULCHER BAY. He works from his home office in Ithaca, New York. 
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